Locnville

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Locnville

Thursday, 14 November 2013

HOT! Billie Joe + Norah - Foreverly

Green Day front man Billie Joe Armstrong and singer and songwriter Norah Jones have teamed up to record Foreverly, an unforgettable 12-song collection inspired by Songs Our Daddy Taught Us, an album of traditional Americana songs reinterpreted, recorded, and released by The Everly Brothers in 1958. Recorded in nine days, Foreverly, captures the beauty of the Everly's stunning close harmonies to create a moving powerful testament to these rootsy ballads. Jones and Armstrong reinterpret several traditional songs, including “Roving Gambler,” “Down In The Willow Garden,” “Long Time Gone,” “Who’s Gonna Shoe Your Pretty Little Feet?,” and “Barbara Allen,” as well as country tunes like “That Silver Haired Daddy of Mine” (written by Gene Autry and Jimmy Long) and Karl Davis’ “Kentucky.” “I’ve been a big fan of The Everly Brothers since I was a little boy,” Armstrong says. “A couple of years ago, I discovered Songs Our Daddy Taught Us for the first time, and I fell in love with it. I was playing it every day and thought it would be a cool idea to re-do the record, but with a female singer. I thought of Norah because she can sing anything, from rock to jazz to blues, and I knew her harmonies would be amazing. I thought the songs would take on a different meaning working with her, and she has a really good ear for arrangements. I was mainly intrigued by these old traditionals, country songs, and hymns. When we were done with the album, Norah looked at me and said, ‘I bet you didn’t think you were going to make a country record, huh?’” Armstrong and his engineer, Chris Dugan, travelled to New York to record with Jones at The Magic Shop in Manhattan with two of Jones’ favourite musicians, bassist Tim Luntzel and drummer Dan Rieser. Armstrong and Jones played guitar and piano. Charlie Burnham on fiddle and Johnny Lam on pedal steel guitar rounded out the band. “It was super fun and experimental,” Jones says. "I loved that the original was completely stripped down and a little more obscure.  There was a lot of room to interpret the songs in our own way.”

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