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Thursday, 18 September 2014

Vinny Da Vinci - The Godfather of Deep House Sounds Marks an Era


After 15 years as a curator and influencer in the deep house movement, this edition marks Vinny Da Vinci’s final chapter of his Deep House Sounds series.“In this game, 10 albums is a milestone, particularly in the Deep House genre in South Africa. I think the most rewarding experience over the last fifteen years has been the growth, progression, and receptiveness of Deep House in this market.  The number of new upcoming productions out of South Africa at the moment is staggering and I am glad to have been a part of that growth, both directly and indirectly. Beyond 2015 I plan to focus more on studio production and see where the deep takes me... ” The Godfather of Deep House Sounds has been piloting modern South African masterpieces and forging a launch pad for many of the country’s most popular cuts – tracks that still live on dance floors and have cemented themselves as evergreen radio classics. Vinny has had the immaculate taste and foresight to break tunes such as the Herbert classic, A:xus (‘Baghdad Café’), Spiritchaser (‘These Tears’), Opolopo’s remix of Gregory Porter, DJ Rasoul (‘Let Me Love You’) and many more. The Deep House Sounds series (Vol 1 to Vol 9) have served as templates for the emerging sound of Africanised house and go-tos for aficionados of refined dancefloor fare. True to form, this final release is all class, with an air of melancholy fitting for the send-off. A baker’s dozen of beats, many of these tracks could become our South African summer’s next big one.Deep House Sounds 10 includes contributions by established producers like Timothy J Fairplay, Ananda Project, Scott Grooves and Jovonn. Alongside these are sumptuous and sweeping numbers from the kinds of fresh talent that this series has always celebrated, including Darko Kustura, Dario D’Attis and Steve Paradise. Typically mixed with Vinny’s signature craftsmanship, it’s sad that this series has to end but it’s a joy that the mix sounds every bit as good as its predecessors. Now you can re-visit the series all the way back to 1999 for the first Deep House Sounds collection – a recording that made a serious statement of intent by opening with Herbert’s soon-to-be-massive remix of Moloko’s ‘Sing It Back’.

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